Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3)

Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3) photo
Some of the More Interesting Terrain on Ouachita Trail 02-C – Between Hwy 259 and Pashubbe Trailhead

For this Ouachita Trail subsection which I am calling “02-C,” I began (and parked) at the Big Cedar Trailhead. It is on Highway 259, about 2 miles south of the Talimena Highway (Highway 1).

CLICK – Google Maps Directions (Approx.) to Big Cedar Trailhead

From there, the trail heads east, crossing 259. (Be sure to look both ways.) It continues heading east for about 4 miles, ending at the Pashubbe Trailhead. Hills, water, and rock formations are what make hikes more interesting for me.

At first, I was thought this wasn’t going to be a very interesting hike. The first third-mile is an old road. The first 4/5-mile has little elevation change.

Fortunately, the rest of the hike was more interesting.

Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3) photo
The first half mile of 02-C is an old road.

The second mile has a nice incline of around 300 feet. There are a few good views of the mountains in the higher elevation areas.

There are two significant creeks, Big Branch and Elkins Branch. Neither was difficult to cross. Big Branch was pretty cool.

Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3) photo
There were still a few inches of snow on the ground when I started that morning.
Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3) photo
Big Branch – Ouachita Trail 02-C

This subsection ends at the Pashubbe Trailhead. Before you reach Pashubbe, you’ll notice the signs indicating you are entering a federal wilderness area. Here you are in the Upper Kiamichi Wilderness.

The Pashubbe Trailhead has parking. To reach it by driving, you’ll need to travel down FR 6032.

On the February morning when I started this hike, there were still a few inches of snow on the ground. I think hiking in the snow is pretty cool as long as it is not deep enough to hide significant rocks. This morning, there was enough snow to be pretty, but not enough to make walking difficult.

The sun came out, and it warmed up. By afternoon, it was in the 40’s. I was kind of disappointed the snow disappeared, but it was very nice winter hiking weather.

As usual, I have posted some of my photos and a gpx map made from my gps data. You can click the photos for a larger view.

Maps
Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3) photo
Ouachita Trail 02-Big Cedar Trailhead to Pashubbe Trailhead – Contour Map (Click to Enlarge)
CLICK – Interactive Trail Map

 

Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3) photo
Elevation profile based on gps data.

VITAL INFO

Trail Name and LocationOuachita Trail (02-C) Miles: 30.5 to 34.3
County, StateLeFlore County, Oklahoma
Date Hiked02-11-2011
Weather/Conditions30's/40's, cool.
DirectionsI started and parked at the Big Cedar Trailhead. It is on Highway 259 (there is a sign), about 2 miles south of the Talimena Highway (Highway 1). From there, you cross Hwy 259 and head east.
Hike Length/Type3.8 miles each way/7.6 miles out and back
Other Permitted UsageNone
Difficulty

(1=Easy; 5=Most Difficult)

3
ATT Cell Coverage?Mostly.
Official Info - Phone/Links501-321-5202 Website.

Click here for gpx file download.

[Last updated 3-22-2017]

2 thoughts on “Ouachita Trail 02: Hwy 259 to Pashubbe Trailhead (30.5 to 34.3)”

  1. Hi,

    My brother and I are planning a three day hiking trip from the Big Cedar trailhead point to Rich Mountain and back. How exactly is the parking situation at Big Cedar? Is there a marked parking area that would be relatively safe to leave a car unattended for three days? Any additional info would be very helpful. Thanks, and I really like your site. It’s a good resource for fellow backpackers/hikers!

    Thanks,
    Sean

  2. Sean,

    There is a parking area there at the Big Cedar trailhead. (Check out this Street View link to see the sign on Hwy 259.) I haven’t been there for awhile. It’s probably gravel. As far as safety, I can’t guarantee anything, but I haven’t heard about any break-ins or vandalism with parked cars in the national forest. I wouldn’t recommend leaving valuables in your car.

    Thanks for the kind comments about the site. Hope you have a good trip! Mike

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